Forget the fleeting; pursue the permanent.

In today’s world there is so much pulling at us. Much of it is of little permanent value. Some examples which come to mind:

  • Our position at our place of employment
  • Our position at church
  • The size and market value of our house
  • Our obsession over a sport
  • The type of car we drive or we how we customize it

Some of these things have counterparts which are important. Having a decent job allows us to provide for our family and contribute to the Kingdom. Serving God out of a sense of love and adoration is part of the Christian life. We need shelter to keep us safe. And in some areas of the world, especially in the US, getting back and forth is significantly easier if we have our own car. Those things, in proper perspective, are fine. It’s when we cross the line into obsession and love that we have a serious issue. Only one item on the list doesn’t have a solid parallel, but having grown up playing sports and being a fan, I’ve seen sports do amazing things. Things like stop a civil war: in 2006, when the Ivory Coast qualified for a World Cup, the warring factions agreed to a ceasefire to support their national team, though fighting resumed in 2011.

Do not love the world or the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world—the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life—is not from the Father but is from the world. And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever. – 1 John 2:15-17, ESV

When we look at our goals, our priorities, our relationships, and our desires, we will reject some as ungodly. Those are the easy ones. Hopefully we will have the courage to turn away from them. However, if you’re like me you’ll find you have some which aren’t easily categorized or which you will find are even put in the godly stack. These others should raise the question, “Why am I pursuing them?” For instance, am I pursuing a relationship with someone because I genuinely want to get to know that person and become a friend or am I doing so because of what that person can do for me? Am I latching on to this latest business opportunity because it’ll add more comfort to my life or because there’s a genuine Kingdom purpose in doing so? Am I serving in this ministry role because I feel called by God to be in the spot I’m in or is it because I like the reputation it gives me and perhaps even the power behind it?

In each case, the argument can be made that there’s a genuine, godly reason to do those things. And in each case we can find a very worldly reason why those things are pursued. This is the point of John’s words. Why am I doing what I do? Why are you? Are we pursuing things of the world, the desires of the flesh and the eyes and the pride of life, or are we pursuing Christ? Anything that we pursue that isn’t of Christ is fleeting. It won’t last. What is of Christ is forever. Let’s expend our efforts for what is permanent. Let us invest in what will stand the test of eternity. Let us do these things for the right reason: our love of Christ and our adoration of Him. And let us put aside that which is born out of a love of the world and what it considers precious.

 

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